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Rye Neck Middle School

300 Hornidge Road
Mamaroneck, NY 10543


Eric Lutinski, Ed.D.
Principal/Assistant Superintendent
for Instruction

(914) 777-4702
elutinski@ryeneck.org

Announcements


The parent orientation for incoming 6th graders was held on Tuesday, April 17th.  If you were unable to attend, please click HERE to view the presentation.  Feel free to contact MS Guidance Counselor Meegan Lawlor with any questions.


2018-2019 MIDDLE SCHOOL SUPPLY LISTS

2018 Middle School Summer Reading List


RYE NECK MIDDLE SCHOOL 3RD QUARTER HONOR ROLL

RYE NECK MIDDLE SCHOOL YEARBOOK INFORMATION


MANDATORY REQUIREMENT FOR STUDENTS ENTERING OR ENROLLING IN GRADE 7 AND 12 BY SEPTEMBER 1, 2018 

Please click HERE for information. 

PRINCIPAL'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The 2017-18 Middle School PAC Members are:

Jean Lipman (PTSA VP)

Cindy Fasolino

Stacy Lavelle

Devina O'Reilly

April Tunno


RYE NECK RECORDER 

The Rye Neck Middle School Newspaper is the District's first online newspaper started in 2009.  Middle School students have the opportunity to submit summaries of articles that they've read about topics and issues of interest to them.  Ranging from global concerns on human rights to new scientific discoveries to "feel-good" stories, Rye Neck Middle School School students are exploring the world beyond their community  and reporting back to their peers with a new-found knowledge and awareness.

The current issue of the ​Rye Neck Recorder​ can be found at 



 

MS CLUBS & ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS

Slide Show Description of Clubs and Enrichment Programs

List of Clubs and Enrichment Programs (includes day, time and location)

  

Please visit our Nurse Services page for the most recent health requirements and forms.

 

USING THE PARENT PORTAL

Please check the portal regularly to avoid surprises, and discuss what you see with your child.  If you are unsure how to use the Parent Portal, please view this prezi to answer any questions you may have.   

 

Helping Your Child Succeed in Middle School

 

News


Rye Neck MS a Gold Star No Place for Hate School 

Rye Neck Middle School was designated as a Gold Star No Place for Hate School by the Anti-Defamation League for the fifth consecutive year. A small group of students, along with sixth-grade school counselor Meegan Lawlor and art teacher Trisha Appel, accepted a banner during a ceremony in New York City on May 29.

“This recognition shows that our school is actively working to create a more inclusive environment,” Lawlor said. “The No Place for Hate program has provided a structure for what has always been one of the most important parts of middle school counseling. It’s wonderful for the students to attend the recognition ceremony. We all came back inspired and feeling rewarded.”

Throughout the year, sixth- through eighth-graders participated in a variety of activities as part of the schoolwide No Place for Hate program, designed to increase student awareness about respect, create an inclusive and tolerant school community and empower students to reduce bullying. After reading Nora Raleigh Baskin’s book, “Anything But Typical,” which highlights the importance of acceptance, not just tolerance, the students welcomed the author to their school to discuss the inspirations behind her books and participate in a writer’s workshop. In addition, sixth-graders created a diversity quilt to learn about the importance of community and participated in a workshop that taught them how to prevent online bullying. 

During No Name-Calling Week, sixth- and eighth-graders learned that their words can affect others, and seventh-graders discussed the power of the bystander and how important it is to move from “bystander” to “upstander” or ally. In addition, each homeroom throughout the school focused on an attribute that would make their middle school a safer and kinder place to be, such as kindness or open-mindedness, and created a chain of examples of things they could do in their individual lives to make Rye Neck Middle School a No Place for Hate school. 

“These activities help students to take ownership of their environment and realize how incredibly powerful each student is,” Lawlor said. “When a group of students truly believe that their voices can make a difference, it helps to create a positive, inclusive school environment. The No Place for Hate program doesn’t guarantee that there will never be conflict, but that we are committed to addressing it.”